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Equipping followers of Christ to engage in their everyday work as the work of God, so workplaces are invigorated, communities flourish and culture is renewed to the honor and glory of the Lord.

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Saturday, July 17, 2010

God of Concrete, God of Steel

One of the great things about work is rest! No rest is sweeter than rest following good hard work. With this in mind, I'll be resting from my blogging for the next six weeks. It is hard to believe I've been at it for nearly a year now. Time flies when you're having fun!

But before I sign off, let me share a few more practical thoughts for pastors.

I'm not big on calender-driven sermons (except at Christmas and Easter), but Labor Day weekend is a good time to focus on work. For the past few years, the church Kathy and I attend (Westminster Chapel, Bellevue, WA) has made the Labor Day service a time to focus on the biblical view of work.

Our Labor Day services have not only contained sermons on work, but also special music, congregational singing, and sharing of congregants' experiences in the integration of faith and work.

Music about the work of human hands is not easy to find. One of the most fascinating pieces of music ever to grace one of our Labor Day services is called, God of Concrete, God of Steel. The title itself tells you this is no ordinary song!

It starts out like this:

God of concrete, God of steel,
God of piston and of wheel,
God of pylon, God of steam,
God of girder and of beam,
God of atom, God of mine:
all the world of power is thine.

Lord of cable, Lord of rail,
Lord of freeway and of mail,
Lord of rocket and of flight,
Lord of soaring satellite,
Lord of lightning's flashing line:
all the world of speed is thine.


Words:  Richard G. Jones

(c) 1968 Stainer & Bell, Ltd. (Admin. Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, IL 60188, www.hopepublishing.com) All rights reserved.  Used by permission.


I'll conclude with three suggestions for sermons on work:

1. Eight sermons by Haddon Robinson, appropriate for a series or as independent messages: http://www.preachingtodaysermons.com/rohabyswofyo.html

2. Larry Peabody's sermon series on Daniel, coinciding with his new book, Job-Shadowing Daniel: Walking the Talk At Work. For more about Larry's book, see http://www.calledintowork.com/resources/. Send Larry a request for information about his "Daniel sermon series" at http://www.calledintowork.com/contact/.

3. More Than A Paycheck, a collection of 24 messages on theology of work, with practical illustrations of faith at work. Includes 50 video clips, 650 PowerPoint slides and the complete speaking notes that I have used when presenting this material myself. Go to http://www.biblicalworldview.com/teach_m_y.html.

See you in September--on Labor Day Weekend!

4 comments:

  1. Thank you for all the work you do.

    Christina

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  2. Christian, I'd be interested in knowing where to find the tune for the song, "God of Concrete, God of Steel." Have a great break--but we'll miss you!

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  3. Good question. If you can locate the Hymn Book of the Anglican Church of Canada and the United Church of Canada (1971 edition), you should find it there.

    But it can be sung to any melody with 777777 meter -- six lines of seven syllables. For example, "Rock of Ages." Try it.

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    Replies
    1. If you like, an mp3 of the (kind of awful) rendition I made from the sheet music I was provided is still up on the Wayback Machine archive of that page:

      http://web.archive.org/web/20080703195116/http://www.flyingfists.org/archives/003114.html

      I'm fairly sure Seth Cooke of BangTheBore.com also recorded a version of it for an art/sound installation he was involved with that had to do with nuclear power.

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